All posts by Beth Cheuk

Floyer for Equity Forum to be held at CHS on 10/23 at 7pm.

Response to The New York Times/ProPublica Article

Floyer for Equity Forum to be held at CHS on 10/23 at 7pm.
Please join us on October 23 at 7 p.m. at Charlottesville High for a community discussion on equity.

On October 16, 2018,  ProPublica and The New York Times published an article about educational disparities among white and black students in Charlottesville City Schools. To learn more about our response to the article and to further explore the issues raised by the article, see below.

Response from Dr. Rosa Atkins, Superintendent

Dr. Rosa Atkins
Dr. Rosa Atkins

Dear Community Members,

A recent New York Times article explored the achievement gap at Charlottesville City Schools, with the underlying theme that we are not making progress toward our shared goal of serving all students well. Specifically, the article focuses on areas where we have not closed the black/white achievement gap and features several students and families who describe ways in which our schools have not been fully supportive of them or other black students and families.

While the article highlights areas that still need work, we believe it is important to provide balance to this story. For example, we see tremendous growth in areas such as rising graduation rates (a 25 percentage point gain for our black students since 2006) and shrinking achievement gaps on nationally normed tests. We’ve also seen  suspension rates plummet (down 83 percent in a decade) as we have instituted a nationally recognized emphasis on mental health, positive supports, and social-emotional well-being. Pull-out quote: believe our primary response should be to listen and learn from the central truth of this article: We have not made consistent or satisfactory progress for all our students. Our efforts to achieve equity infuse every area of our work, and we are proud of our teachers and staff members and the ways they work for and with our students.

Let me be clear that we are not satisfied with the status quo….

To read full letter, click here.

…in fact, all of us work at Charlottesville City Schools because we want to see true equity. We are committed to helping all our students excel, and we intentionally seek expertise, training, partnerships, and new practices that will promote equity. We also know that our country’s schools alone cannot solve a societal plague that has been in place 400 years and which is reinforced by growing wage gaps, our affordable housing shortage, and more. And let us remember that success is not accurately portrayed in either a low SOL score or a high graduation rate. Reality is more complicated than data.

As we respond to the article, we face several choices. We can complain about the portrayal. We can dispute ideas and characterizations that seem wrong or incomplete. We can defend ourselves by pointing out the various programs and practices that are in place to address these concerns. We can recite other statistics that paint a brighter – but still not equitable – portrait of our current status.

But I believe our primary response should be to listen and learn from the central truth of this article: We have not made consistent or satisfactory progress for all our students. Through this article and through a beautiful presentation by the CHS Black Student Union at our October School Board meeting, we can learn from the words and experiences of our brave students and families who are advocating for their peers and the students who will follow them through our schools. We need to learn why our significant efforts to promote equity have so far not yielded all the fruit that we hope for.

Therefore, our first action  will be engagement and outreach, beginning with a community forum on October 23, at 7 p.m. at CHS. As we speak, we will describe how we have been approaching this issue. As we listen, we will seek to learn why our programs and efforts have not connected with more of our students and families. As we learn, we will identify resources and strategies that will enable us to adjust our programs, practices, culture, and commitments. As we speak, listen and learn, we will work to build mutual trust among each other and between ourselves and our community of students, families, and advocates.

Why is equity so important? Some of us will speak of righting wrongs. Some of us will speak of the beauty and value of diversity. As a black woman and a human, I am invested in justice and I am inspired by diversity. I also focus on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s reminder that we are all interrelated and “tied in a single garment of destiny.” The future health and prosperity of Charlottesville depends on all of the members of our community. I’m struck by the words that Australian artist Lilla Watson expressed on behalf of the Aboriginal community: “If you have come here to help me, you are wasting your time. But if you have come because your liberation is bound up with mine, then let us work together.”

Charlottesville, let us work together.

Dr. Rosa S. Atkins
Superintendent

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Response from the Charlottesville City Schools Board

The School Board would like to affirm the sentiments of Dr. Atkins’ letter. Like the teachers, administrators, and staff of Charlottesville City Schools, we serve on the School Board because we want to advocate for all students. These issues have been at the forefront of our discussions and actions. These persistent disparities are what prompted us to run and serve. Specifically, we would like to say to our community…

To read full letter, click here.

  • We are proud of our students, and want to help them achieve even more.
  • We are appreciative of our teachers and staff members, and we want to support them by creating policies and practices that allow them to be even more effective.
  • We are mindful of our school families and community members who bring varying perspectives and experiences. We want to work more closely with you to move our schools and community forward.

We are looking forward to Tuesday’s Community Forum on Equity. As we listen to our community, we will learn more and build on our current strengths and our shared commitment for equity in Charlottesville. We acknowledge that much work lies in front of us, and we are committed to this work.

Juan Wade, chair; Sherry Kraft, vice-chair; James Bryant; Lisa Larson-Torres; Amy Laufer; Jennifer McKeever; and Leah Puryear.

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Overview of Charlottesville City Schools’ Emphasis on Equity

Our efforts to promote student growth and success are ongoing and extensive. For an overview of our approach and efforts, click here.

Community Forum on Equity

Join us on October 23 at 7pm at CHS for a community forum to discuss where we are and where we want to be.

A Deeper Dive on Specific Topics Addressed in or Related to the Article

Achievement Gap

In 2016 Stanford University’s Graduate School of Education published a national data set of K-12 standardized test scores. One conclusion of the review suggests that while the achievement gap is an enduring national problem, it is acutely apparent in many college towns. And like school divisions in Berkeley, Chapel Hill, and Ann Arbor, we have been vigorously working to implement best practices and innovate new solutions. Like those other school divisions, we have seen progress but still have goals to accomplish. For an overview of our efforts, please visit charlottesvilleschoools.org/equity.

Among other programs and efforts, it describes our sometimes pioneering work in areas such as:

  • designing “honors-option” classes in English and other high school subjects, which has led to a significant increase in honors and advanced class enrollment, particularly among African-American students. In these honors-option classes, students elect assignments and readings that will lead to either standard or honors-level credit. Based on the success of this strategy, CHS continues to expand these options.
  • developing a iSTEM program to reach all our students (even in the elementary schools) so that we can teach design thinking, build coding skills, demystify STEM skills, and build bridges to our internationally acclaimed middle- and high-school engineering programs.
  • creating a culture of trauma sensitivity, social-emotional learning, and positive climate that is foundational to academic and personal growth. Our pilot of elementary SEAL (social emotional and academic learning) classrooms (at Greenbrier and Clark Elementary Schools) is a unique offering that is already generating findings and best practices applicable in all our classrooms. Our establishment of two key programs (Positive Behavior and Supports and Virginia Tiered Systems of Supports) gained state acclaim for its emphasis on mental health; the program was featured as a case study by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

Advanced Course Enrollment/Course Selection

We are not yet where we want to be in seeing diverse enrollment in advanced classes, AP classes, and Dual Enrollment classes. However, we have seen gains in honors, dual enrollment, and AP enrollment from 2015-16 to 2017-18 for our African-American students, with black students’ participation in honors classes up 29 percent (even excluding enrollment in honors-option classes). We attribute this trend to a number of factors, including our locally-developed strategy of honors-option classes and our strong AVID program (which prepares students for college success).

In addition, CHS has redesigned its process for teachers making course recommendations; the new process gives students greater agency in goal-setting so that the student and teacher can work together to prepare for success in the next year’s chosen courses.

2004 Audit by Phi Delta Kappa

An audit of Charlottesville Schools’ efforts to promote racial parity was commissioned in 2004 during a time of tremendous turmoil at Charlottesville City Schools. When Dr. Atkins joined the district in 2006, she became our ninth superintendent (or interim superintendent) in thirteen years. In 2004-5 there was a particularly divisive 10-month period in which a new superintendent came and left, leaving a wake of uncertainty and polarization.

In the midst of this turmoil, the 2004 audit was completed but did not receive the support or buy-in of the school community. In fact, the audit itself became a symbol of this divisiveness.

Because of its unpopularity, the audit was not revived when Dr. Atkins joined the schools two years later, but the ideas of the audit and its commitment to equity have appeared in Charlottesville City Schools’ strategic plans and initiatives. Some of these initiatives include a major shift toward data-driven decision-making, our award-winning use of instructional technology, reorganization of central office staff to better support school staff, and the creation and annual review of our curricular Guides to Pacing and Standards that provide pacing, standards, and resources.

Elementary School Zones

All of our elementary schools are diverse and have a significant number of students who are economically disadvantaged. At Venable Elementary, for instance, students of color make up 41 percent of the enrollment, and students who are economically disadvantaged, 39 percent.

Having said that, our elementary schools do not, and have not ever, featured an equal distribution of income levels and racial/ethnic groups. Generally speaking, Greenbrier, Burnley-Moran, and Venable have a higher percentage of white and higher-income students than Clark, Jackson-Via, and Johnson. This is reflective of our city’s neighborhoods.

Even so, last winter, as part of our planning meetings and community forums on our growing resident enrollment, Assistant Superintendent for Finance and Operations Kim Powell told media, City Council members, School Board Members, and community members that “Rezoning the elementary schools is in our future.” The process of how and when to rezone is dependent on which facilities solution our community elects.

It should be noted that professional planners and individual Charlottesville residents have concluded over the years that this rezoning will not be simple; “solving” the balance at one school worsens the balance at another. As with all issues, what we see in the schools is a reflection of our community. We hope that this work will be complemented by the City of
Charlottesville’s recent and current work on affordable housing and other equity issues that impact our City neighborhoods.

Extending the Bridges to Literacy (as compared to QUEST gifted instruction)

In Charlottesville City Schools, the primary supports for students who need extra assistance are offered during the school day in ways that mirror the structure of the gifted program.  In addition, our elementary schools offer a voluntary after-school program called Extending the Bridges to Literacy program. To learn more, read on.

Extending the Bridges to Literacy (EBL) is in the third year of a pilot supported by state grant funding. The point of the grant is to prompt schools’ innovation in extending the learning day for at-risk students (either by adding school days or after-school hours). It’s difficult to compare an after-school pilot to established, in-school programs such as the QUEST program or the supports led by our reading specialists. Both the reading specialists and the gifted teachers follow a similar collaborative model for working with classroom teachers to identify the students who would (at that moment) benefit from their push-in and pull-out services. The goal of the EBL after-school program is to provide voluntary extra learning time for students who might benefit from it, and its chief strategy is to build motivation and confidence by capitalizing on students’ own interests with individualized reading suggestions. As for resources, the EBL program has ample classroom space, specifically trained teachers, and a very low 1:6 teacher-student ratio.

Gifted Education (QUEST)

We would like to state the obvious: that giftedness is distributed equally among all groups, and when we, like other school divisions, fail to identify and nurture all expressions of giftedness, it is a loss to our entire community.

No identification process will ever be perfect, so aside from students who are identified for gifted services, a pool of high-potential students from traditionally underserved groups also receives QUEST services. In addition, in recent years, pull-out services are only part of our efforts; the program relies on a model of collaboration between the QUEST teacher and classroom teachers. Our gifted teachers also do push-in instruction with small groups and the whole class so that all Charlottesville City Schools students benefit from access to the QUEST teachers and the instructional strategies that they offer.

As for the identification process itself, referrals and identification for the program are continuous; the division uses multiple criteria and a variety of screening methods to facilitate equitable consideration of students. The VA Department of Education’s 2017 report “Increasing Diversity in Gifted Education Programs in Virginia” references several of our practices because they recognized the innovative and inclusive intent of our processes. Even so, until our QUEST program reflects the full range of giftedness in our community, we will continue to seek out and create new solutions and approaches.

For questions about our after-school Extending the Bridges to Literacy program (which is not a parallel program to QUEST), see above.

Graduation Rates; Standard vs. Advanced Diploma

Philosophically, CHS and Charlottesville City Schools have a goal of opening doors for students and pushing students to do their best, set and attain goals, and prepare for success in their adult lives.

Our African-American graduation completion index has risen 12 points since 2011 — and compared with our low point in 2006, it has risen 25 points! Graduation is a far more important marker for future educational and employment opportunities than diploma type, and we are proud of all our students’ accomplishments.

Our African-American students’ rates of attainment of the two types of diplomas track much more strongly with their black peers across Virginia than with their white peers at CHS. We want to empower our students to set their own path, and we want to support them in their goals. When there are barriers that prevent our students’ success, we advocate for them by seeking legislative solutions (such as the SOL testing flexibility we gained in Virginia for English language learners) or by developing programs to help students attain their goals. For instance, one commonly cited barrier to attainment of the advanced diploma is the world language requirement. At the request of students and families, we have worked to offer American Sign Language as an offering, and on a broader scale, we developed a much-copied elementary Spanish program to familiarize all of our students with a world language. Where we identify barriers, we want to work with our community to identify solutions.

Hiring/Supporting Teachers of Color

African American Teaching Fellows logoAt Charlottesville City Schools, we actively recruit minority teachers and staff to better reflect our diverse student body. For example, we partner with the  University of Virginia’s African American Teaching Fellows program and recruit at HBCUs (Historically Black Colleges and Universities).

Among our teaching staff, 16 percent are presently people of color (with 11 percent being African American). Among our entire staff, 25 percent are presently people of color (with 22 percent being African American).

The diversity of our teaching staff lags slightly below the metro area’s demographics:

Graph showing Cville area population vs Cville Schools teachers. Call 245-2962 for information.

When all Charlottesville Schools employees are considered, our staff is slightly more diverse than the Charlottesville metro area.Graph showing Cville area population vs all Cville Schools employees.. Call 245-2962 with questions.

Our staff — and shown here, our teachers — do not mirror the diversity of our student population, a much more challenging goal given that most of our applicants and employees live within the metro area:Graphic showing ethnic demographics of Cville Schools teachers vs those for Cville Schools students. For info, please call 245-2962

Reading Instruction

The state’s Standards of Learning tests are an easy way to get a point-in-time snapshot of whether a a student met a specific threshold, but these tests are criticized for their frequent changes to content and format and their inability to measure a student’s growth.

Charlottesville City Schools has experimented with several growth measurement tools in the past years and starting in the 2018 year, we are using the nationally normed MAP test in grades 2-8. This data will help us identify individual and group needs and customize supports. It will also give us a better picture of our students’ growth and abilities relative to schools across the country. MAP data suggests that our students are growing  and that over time, a greater percentage of our students  (in all racial/ethnic categories) are demonstrating reading proficiency.

What are our other commitments for reading instruction in recent and current years?

Updates for this year’s literacy initiatives include:

  • robust data walls to track growth and needs so that instruction and interventions with reading specialists and others can be more timely and effective;
  • better alignment with SPED and other programs and increased training/progress monitoring requirements;
  • revised/new curriculum for Benchmark Literacy and Calkins Units of Study in Writing;
  • professional learning for reading specialists (who in turn lead school-based literacy work) that specifically addresses the achievement gap.

We offer an array of in-school strategies and supports for students who need them. In addition, we are in year three of a state-funded pilot of “Extending the Bridges to Literacy,” a voluntary after-school program. This program is an example of ways that we are innovating to address these concerns.

SOL Scores (Virginia’s standardized testing system)

As we make clear with every announcement of accreditation and Standards of Learning (SOL) test scores, we – along with our peers across the state – have reservations about the SOL tests and what they do and do not measure. The state’s Standards of Learning tests are an easy way to get a point-in-time snapshot of whether a a student met a specific threshold, but these tests are criticized for their frequent changes in content and format and their inability to measure a student’s growth.  They are a point-in-time measure of a cohort’s knowledge on a series of disparate exams.

Do we take SOL scores seriously?  Of course. They are an important state measure, and they also point out the disparities that we need to address for our students of color and our students who face economic disadvantages.

Due to the diagnostic limitations of the SOL tests, however, we have spent several years surveying and testing nationally accepted instruments that are more helpful in guiding our instruction.   This year, we have implemented the use of the MAP test for reading and math, which creates a portrait of individual students’ and cohorts’ growth. These nationally normed tools indicate that the tremendous gaps that we find in our preschool populations diminish over the years that our students are enrolled at Charlottesville City Schools, leading to our strong end-of-course pass rates and our rising graduation rate at CHS.

Suspensions

We have made tremendous progress in reducing our rate of suspensions. In the last decade, the division-wide rate of suspensions has dropped 83 percent, and at Charlottesville High School, it has dropped 87 percent. We are very proud of these dramatic gains. We are still making progress on the disproportionality of the remaining suspensions, which we are addressing in a number of ways.

We continue to scaffold our systems of supports (Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports and Virginia Tiered Systems of Supports), which offer a more holistic and data-driven approach and direct attention to underlying issues. In a similar
vein, we are a founding member of the Greater Charlottesville Trauma Informed Community Network, which provides professional learning and shared resources to help our schools and community agencies.

In addition, as part of our larger commitment to creating an environment that is welcoming and supportive to all, we have offered professional learning focusing on issues such as Charlottesville’s African-American history along with a range of small-group and division-wide book studies, film viewings, conferences, and workshops that address issues of racism, systemic barriers, implicit bias, positive climate training, restorative practices, and more.

Next Step: Equity Forum at CHS

  • Community Forum on Equity, October 23, 7pm, CHS

Other Resources and Related Reporting on Equity

Photo of an African-American graduate

Graduation Rates Rise; Community Forum on Equity Scheduled for 10/23

Female graduate walks across the stageContinuing a pattern of growth, the Charlottesville High School on-time graduation rate rose to 92.6 percent for the class of 2018, which exceeds the state’s overall rate. The drop-out rate fell to 4.8 percent, also superior to the state’s rate.

The on-time graduation rate also rose for African-American students in Charlottesville, hitting 88.3 percent. Since 2006, this rate for Charlottesville’s black students has risen almost 25 points.

“We are so proud of our students and the staff who support them. The growth in our black students’ graduation rates in the last twelve years is tremendous,” noted Dr. Rosa Atkins, superintendent. “Even so, we are never complacent, and we see areas for growth. We want to make sure that all of our students are fully prepared for life after graduation.”

PhotoOne growth area is the attainment of the advanced studies diploma across all racial and ethnic groups. At 73 percent, Charlottesville’s white students exceed their state peers in attaining this advanced diploma. Yet Charlottesville’s students of color are far less likely to attain the advanced diploma, which most closely aligns with the requirements of most four-year colleges and universities.

“When we look at our graduation rates, we celebrate the gains our students have made. And just as we encourage our students to do, we then set new goals for achievement,” noted Dr. Atkins.

As part its commitment to supporting all students, Charlottesville City Schools will host a community forum on equity on Tuesday, October 23, at 7 p.m. at Charlottesville High School.

illustration of raised hands with a computer search bar

Help Nights for Back-to-School Forms

illustration of raised hands with a computer search barHaving trouble creating your PowerSchool account? Need to add a child to the account? Want a hand finishing up your back-to-school forms? Working on your free/reduced lunch application?

Call or stop by during our Help Nights on Tuesday and Wednesday, September 4-5.  All Charlottesville families are welcome to attend either event. iSe habla español!

  • On Tuesday, 9/4, from 5-7pm, we’ll be at Clark School (1000 Belmont Avenue).
  • On Wednesday, 9/5, from 5-7pm, we’ll be at CHS (1400 Melbourne Rd).
  • Just need a student ID or a password reset? For student IDs, you can call your school. For password resets or other questions, call either 245-2943 or 245-2962. During the help nights, you can also call 245-2943 from 5-7pm.

Image says "translation -- see top of page" in Spanish, Chinese, Nepali, Arabic, and English.These important back-to-school forms are required for all returning students every year. (If you completed forms for a new student this spring or summer, you do not need to do them again.) Most of the answers are pre-completed for you. These forms help with:

  • health and emergency information
  • field trip permissions
  • authorizations for a friend or relative to pick your child up from school
  • accurate bus information
  • and much more!

Thanks to all who have completed them, and if you need any assistance, please call us or join us for the Help Nights for Back-to-School Forms.

Rick Wellbeloved-Stone

Modified from messages sent to current Charlottesville High School families and staff. If you wish to receive copies of any future messages related to this matter, please sign up here.

Dear Charlottesville High School community—

Rick Wellbeloved-Stone, a former CHS environmental sciences teacher, was sentenced on July 30, 2018 for the production of child pornography. One part of the evidence at the sentencing hearing included photographs taken at CHS during the time frame of 2012-2014. These photographs appear to have been made in his classroom during the school day without students’ knowledge. The police have worked to notify impacted families when possible.

Law enforcement has maintained a 24/7 tipline in case anyone has information relating to this matter. The number is 866-347-2423. Any former students who have information to share or who are concerned that they might have been photographed can contact this number.

The Charlottesville City Schools staff has cooperated fully with law enforcement. We are sorry that this violation of trust occurred in our school, and we are also sorry to relay unsettling news. But we want to give you the facts that are now available as part of our ongoing commitment to being honest and supportive of our community and families. Thank you.


For questions that are not related to the investigation, contact:

Beth Cheuk
cheukb1 at charlottesvilleschools.org
434-245-2400

El regreso a la escuela 2018

feature image of kids and busLe enviaremos por correo cartas con información de regreso a la escuela. Las letras en inglés contienen información personalizada para su familia. Si necesita una traducción al español de la carta, consulte estas cartas:

Para leer este sitio web en español, indica “Translate” (traducir) en la parte por encima de la página y escoja Spanish.

Más información de regreso a la escuela en este sitio web

 

Horario regular de las escuelas:

escuela primaria:  8:00am to 2:30pm
Buford and Walker: 8:30am to 3:15pm
CHS: 9:05am to 3:50pm (con un inicio retrasado de una hora el segundo jueves de algunos meses)

¿Preguntas?

Si tiene preguntas acerca de las escuelas de Charlottesville, llame a nuestra línea telefónica en español al 434-245-2548. Un profesor de español le devolverá la llamada.

First Page of the Letter in English

(Use the “Translate” button to translate the letter into many languages)

PLEASE DO NOW!

1. Log into PowerSchool
PowerSchool is an online tool to help schools, students, and families stay connected. In August, log in to complete back-to-school forms and learn teacher assignments (see
below). Make sure all of your students are added to your parent account.

See the back of this sheet for instructions & personalized access codes. Call your school or 245-2943 for help.

A link to PowerSchool can be found on the “Parent” menu at the bottom of every page of this web site.

2. Complete Back-to-School Forms Online
To complete your back-to-school forms, log into PowerSchool and click on “Re-Registration” at left. Simply edit previous info and answer the remaining questions. After you finish your first child, the program can “snap” updates into other children’s forms.

For kindergartners and new students, these forms are not required.

3. See Teacher Assignments or Student Schedules

The earliest way to learn your student’s schedule and teacher assignment is to check PowerSchool.

Your school will let you know when your schedule/teacher assignment has been posted in PowerSchool.

WANT TO DO MORE?

Free/Reduced Lunch
You’ll receive an application in the mail. Medicaid-qualifying families and students at
Clark, Jackson-Via, and Johnson do not need to complete this form since they automatically qualify for free meals.

Meal Account Balance Checks
Balances are posted in PowerSchool. Families will receive alerts if their meal
balance falls below -$10. You can set other alerts or pay online at “My Payments Plus.” (Online payments charge a service fee of about 4 percent.) Learn more at
charlottesvilleschools.org/nutrition.

Calls/Emails/Text Messages
Choose whether to receive calls, emails, or texts from the schools. Log into PowerSchool and click on School Messenger at the left. Then hover over your user name in top right
corner and select “Preferences.” Edit your settings and click “Save” at bottom. Don’t see an option for text messaging? Select the correct telephone number and add texting for at least one type of message.

Bus Information
Routes will be mailed home with back-to-school information from your school.

Facebook, Twitter, and You Tube
Follow us at @CvilleSchools! Many schools have accounts, as well.

Response to White Nationalist Rally in Charlottesville in August 2017

The events of August 11 and 12, 2017, certainly provided challenges to the Charlottesville community, and in response to those challenges, our teachers provided incredible learning and reflection opportunities for our staff and students.

Collage of teacher convocation in Charlottesville
Collage from the Charlottesville City schools all-staff convocation on August 15, 2017.

Our response to the rallies began with our teachers, who returned to work just days after the rallies. We held an emotional and healing staff-wide convocation to address the events directly. Giving teachers time, space, and resources was one of our first priorities.

Even our elementary students have been given opportunities to process these events through conversation, counseling, community-building activities, and more. As a school division that embraces the arts, we have been heartened to see our schools bring the power of music, art, and literature to bear  as we facilitate crucial conversations about A12 itself and the deeper issues the events raised.

Musically, this includes an inspirational collaboration with Metro Nashville Public Schools using BeBe Winans’ song “Right Now (Need One Another).” (Do yourself a favor and watch the video now. More information can be found here.) Relating to the visual arts,  our schools have organized paint-ins and school-wide art projects that celebrate both commonalities and differences.

CHS students holding message "Hate has no home here."

CHS students engaged in a “Big Read.”

And we have drawn upon the power of literature by organizing a One Book campaign to promote the reading of Angie Thomas’s award-winning young adult novel, The Hate U Give. In addition to classroom discussions, Charlottesville High School invited parent, activist, and UVa professor Lisa Woolfork to lead a powerful conversation about the book with all of our ninth-graders.  This Big Read was complemented by what you might call a Big See — dozens of community screenings of the award-winning documentary, I’m Not a Racist, Am I?

Students at Jefferson School African American Heritage Center for Dialogue on Race
Students at Jefferson School African American Heritage Center for Dialogue on Race

In addition, throughout February, CHS students organized a series of community speakers who offered opt-in, in-school presentations to students for Black History Month, which concluded with the school’s annual assembly. This year’s  assembly speaker was Rashard Davis ’16, winner of a 2018 Super Bowl Ring with the Philadelphia Eagles!

Relatedly, a contingent of CHS students spent a day at the Jefferson School African American Heritage Center, working with the Charlottesville Youth Council  to make meaningful change as part of the community’s “Dialogue on Race.” For more on this important conversation, click here.

This conversation — and the larger work toward racial equity in our schools and in our country — continues. At Charlottesville City Schools, we are committed to this work.

Other links:

Medical Permissions

Allergy Information

oranges peanutsSevere allergies are becoming more frequent in American life and schools. To stay updated on national recommendations and maintain a proactive plan to support students and families, Charlottesville City Schools has worked with the Thomas Jefferson Health Department as well as the “Code Ana” and “Wahoo Cool for School Food Allergy Initiative,” both part of the University of Virginia School of Medicine’s Division of Asthma, Allergy & Immunology.

Parents and guardians should notify the school nurse of their students’ known allergies and related information. At the beginning of the year, schools will send families a letter outlining important information about meal and snack procedures as well as alerting families to common or school-specific allergens.

To Learn More:
Dr. Kendra King
Director of Student Services and Achievement
1562 Dairy Road
Charlottesville, VA 22903
(434) 245-2400
KingK1@charlottesvilleschools.org

clip art for talking bubble filled with various heads

Surveys

Sea of Hands stock photography photoAs we prepare for our upcoming Community Forum on Equity on October 23 at 7 p.m. at CHS, we invite our parents/guardians to complete a short school survey.

You can click here to complete the survey

If you are interested in learning more about the topics addressed in the article (and survey), click here to learn more.

We value your feedback and hope you will share your ideas and questions with us, both on the survey and next Tuesday at the community forum.

 

Summer School at CHS

CHS SUMMER SCHOOL REGISTRATION

Online registration for summer school classes will continue until June 14. CHS will offer both virtual and face-to-face summer classes for current students and rising 9th-graders.

Face-to-Face Courses

Additional information about face-to-face courses can be found here.

  • English 9 (1 Credit)
  • English 10 (1 Credit) – *End of Course SOL Exam
  • English 11 (1 Credit) – *End of Course SOL Exam
  • English 12 (1 Credit)
  • Government (1 Credit)
  • VA & US History (1 Credit) – *End of Course SOL Exam
  • World History 1 (1 Credit) – *End of Course SOL Exam
  • World History 2 (1 Credit) – *End of Course SOL Exam
  • Biology (1 Credit) – *End of Course SOL Exam
  • Earth Science (1 Credit) – *End of Course SOL Exam
  • Algebra 1 (1 Credit) – *End of Course SOL Exam
  • Algebra 2 (1 Credit) – *End of Course SOL Exam
  • Geometry (1 Credit)
  • PE 09 (.5 Credit) – SESSION 1 (June 18 – July 6)
  • PE 10 (.5 Credit) – SESSION 1 (June 18 – July 6)
  • PE 09 (.5 Credit) – SESSION 2 (July 9 – July 27)
  • PE 10 (.5 Credit) – SESSION 2 (July 9 – July 27)
  • Behind-the-Wheel for driver’s education: this is a separate sign-up. Click here!

Virtual (Online) Courses

Additional information about virtual (online) courses may be found here.

  • PE 09 (.5 Credit)
  • Health 09 (.5 Credit)
  • PE 10 (.5 Credit)
  • Health 10 / Driver’s Ed (.5 Credit)
  • Economics and Personal Finance (1 Credit)

Cost

Students attending CHS in the 2018-19 school year are considered “In District.”  Students on Free or Reduced Lunch are eligible for reduced tuition rates. Out-of-district students are not eligible for Free/Reduced rates. Tuition is non-refundable.

Course In District Tuition Price Out of District Tuition Price Reduced Lunch Tuition Price Free Lunch Tuition Price
Full Credit Course $400 each $550 each $200 each $25 Each
1/2 Credit Course:
PE 09 & 10
Health 9 & 10
$200 each $350 each $100 each $25 Each

You may bring your tuition payment (cash, check or money order payable to Charlottesville High School) to the CHS Office.

Or, you can pay your summer school tuition online through MySchoolBucks at http://bit.ly/chssummertuition. A convenience fee will apply.

Steps to Register Online

    1. Complete your online registration: go to bit.ly/chssummerschool2018 to complete the online form.
    2. Pay summer tuition online at bit.ly/chssummertuition (convenience fee applies) or bring cash, check or money order to CHS office.
    3. ALL students must complete a Student Information Form – mail or bring into CHS office.

Walk-In Registration on April 30

Walk-in registration will held be at Charlottesville High School on April 30th at 9:30am – 11:30am.

Additional Questions? Please contact:

Portraits of Stephanie Carter and Eric Johnson

Buford Principal Announcements

portrait of Eric JohnsonDear Buford families–

We have two important announcements about the future of Buford. The first is that at the end of this year, Mr. Eric Johnson will be leaving Buford to become the principal of Charlottesville City Schools’ hospital education program at U.Va. Medical Center. We are tremendously appreciative of Mr. Johnson’s service at Buford and are delighted that he will remain on the Charlottesville Schools staff in this new position.

Stephanie Carter portraitThe second announcement is related. Because of the timing of Mr. Johnson’s announcement, we were in the position to move quickly to identify his successor. Starting this summer, Mrs. Stephanie Carter will become the new principal at Buford. Since 2014, Mrs. Carter has headed up Lugo-McGinness Academy, the alternative learning center at Charlottesville City Schools. She has won statewide attention for her redesign of that program — and all the while, she has also overseen our division’s virtual education and career and technical education programs. Please join me in thanking Mr. Johnson for his excellent service at Buford and wishing him well in his new role in hospital education. And please also join me in welcoming Mrs. Carter to the Buford community.

 

 

More about Mr. Johnson

The new leader of the Charlottesville City Schools Hospital Education Program at U.Va. will be Eric Johnson. Mr. Johnson has served as principal at Buford since 2008. He earned his bachelor’s in psychology from the University of Virginia and his master’s in middle school education from James Madison University.  He had previously served as a principal and assistant principal at other schools in the area since 2000. At Buford, Mr. Johnson has been known for his tremendous warmth and abilities in nurturing the school’s community. He has been a powerful advocate for our partnership with City Schoolyard Garden, a program that began at Buford, and he also helped establish the AVID program at Buford, which is key to the program’s success at Charlottesville High School. Mr. Johnson has also been active in the community in areas such as serving as chairman of the board of the African American Teaching Fellows Program.

More about Mrs. Carter

At Buford Middle School, Stephanie Carter will assume responsibilities as principal. Mrs. Carter has overseen the work of Lugo-McGinness Academy since it was established in 2014, transforming our alternative learning center into a state model for trauma-sensitive, student-centered education. After establishing the model at LMA, she has developed satellite programs at Buford and Walker. In addition, since 2011 while an administrator at CHS, Ms. Carter has overseen the launch and growth of our division’s virtual education programs as well as our career and technical education (CTE) programs, both of which draw on her background in instructional technology. In 2017, Mrs. Carter was named Outstanding Community Partner by U.Va.’s Teen Health Center, and in 2008, she earned a Virginia Department of Education award for excellence in CTE programs. She has also served on state-wide committees and presented widely. Prior to coming to Charlottesville, Mrs. Carter served as Director of Technology and CTE in Mecklenburg County Schools.