Tours for Potential Venable Students

Ven-Bldg_edVenable will be offering tours to parents on the dates listed below.  All tours take place at 9:15 a.m. and last approximately 30-45 minutes. We limit the number of participants on each tour to ensure that everyone can hear and ask questions.  Please call Ms. Lawson in the Venable office to register – 434-245-2418.

Upcoming Dates:

  • January 19
  • February 23
  • March 16
  • April 13

Parents should plan to arrive in the front office a few minutes early to sign in and receive visitors’ passes.  Please allot time for parking as there are typically few spots available on site and many of the neighborhood streets do not permit non-resident parking during the day.

Unfortunately, requests for tours at other dates and times cannot be honored due to the disruption to classes.

If you are an out-of-division family who would like to apply for a space at Venable next year, we begin accepting applications in April.  Click here for information about the application process. 

Tours for Potential Jackson-Via Students

Front of Jackson-Via Elementary SchoolJackson-Via will be offering tours to parents on the dates listed below.  All tours take place at 9:15 a.m. and last approximately 30-45 minutes. We limit the number of participants on each tour to ensure that everyone can hear and ask questions.  Please call Ms. Harlow in the Jackson-Via office to register – 434-245-2416.

Upcoming Dates:

  • November 18
  • December 2
  • January 13
  • February 10
  • March 10
  • April 14

Parents should plan to arrive in the front office a few minutes early to sign in and receive visitors’ passes.  Please allot time for parking as there are typically few spots available on site and many of the neighborhood streets do not permit non-resident parking during the day.

Unfortunately, requests for tours at other dates and times cannot be honored due to the disruption to classes.

If you are an out-of-division family who would like to apply for a space in Charlottesville City Schools next year, we begin accepting applications in April.  Click here for information about the application process. 

Response to White Nationalist Rally in Charlottesville in August 2017

The white nationalist rally in August  2017 certainly provided challenges to the Charlottesville community, and in response to those challenges, our teachers have provided incredible learning and reflection opportunities for our staff and students.

Our response to the rallies began with our teachers, who returned to work just days after the rallies. We held an emotional and healing staff-wide convocation to address the events directly. Giving teachers time, space, and resources was one of our first priorities.

Collage of teacher convocation in Charlottesville
Collage from the Charlottesville City schools all-staff convocation on August 15, 2017.

Even our elementary students have been given opportunities to process these events through conversation, counseling, community-building activities, and more. As a school division that embraces the arts, we have been heartened to see our schools bring the power of music, art, and literature to bear  as we facilitate crucial conversations about A12 itself and the deeper issues the events raised.

Musically, this includes an inspirational collaboration with Metro Nashville Public Schools using BeBe Winans’ song “Right Now (Need One Another).” (Do yourself a favor and watch the video now. More information can be found here.) Relating to the visual arts,  our schools have organized paint-ins and school-wide art projects that celebrate both commonalities and differences.

CHS students holding message "Hate has no home here."

CHS students engaged in a “Big Read.”

And we have drawn upon the power of literature by organizing a One Book campaign to promote the reading of Angie Thomas’s award-winning young adult novel, The Hate U Give. In addition to classroom discussions, Charlottesville High School invited parent, activist, and UVa professor Lisa Woolfork to lead a powerful conversation about the book with all of our ninth-graders.  This Big Read was complemented by what you might call a Big See — dozens of community screenings of the award-winning documentary, I’m Not a Racist, Am I?

Students at Jefferson School African American Heritage Center for Dialogue on Race
Students at Jefferson School African American Heritage Center for Dialogue on Race

In addition, throughout February, CHS students organized a series of community speakers who offered opt-in, in-school presentations to students for Black History Month, which concluded with the school’s annual assembly. This year’s  assembly speaker was Rashard Davis ’16, winner of a 2018 Super Bowl Ring with the Philadelphia Eagles!

Relatedly, a contingent of CHS students spent a day at the Jefferson School African American Heritage Center, working with the Charlottesville Youth Council  to make meaningful change as part of the community’s “Dialogue on Race.” For more on this important conversation, click here.

This conversation — and the larger work toward racial equity in our schools and in our country — continues. At Charlottesville City Schools, we are committed to this work.

Other links:

Summer awards and recognitions collage graphic

Summer Awards and Special Recognitions

School may be out for the summer, but many of our students are busy at work making presentations at conferences and receiving awards and opportunities at the state and national level.

Cole Fairchild hallway picture
Cole Fairchild; Photo: Eze Amos

CHS student Cole Fairchild and engineering teacher Matt Shields were selected as part of the 2018 cohort of Bezos Scholars and recently attended an all-expenses paid trip to the Aspen Ideas Festival.

Each year, the Bezos Family Foundation selects rising public high school seniors who apply with an educator partner to the year-long leadership development program.  After attending the festival, scholars return home to organize their own community change projects, known as Local Ideas Festivals (LIFs). We can’t wait to see what Cole and Mr. Shields have planned.

Zyahna Bryant; Photo: Matt Eich
Zyahna Bryant; Photo: Matt Eich

Meanwhile, CHS student Zyahna Bryant is preparing to accept multiple awards for her student leadership on social justice issues.  In September, Zyahna will travel to Connecticut to accept the 2018 Harriet Beecher Stowe Foundation Student Stowe Prize and $1,000 for her essay on social justice. In October, she will accept the 2018 Yale Bassett Award for Community Engagement. In addition, this spring she was the recipient of the 2018 Princeton Prize in Race Relations for her advocacy work at CHS and recently attended a two-day conference at Princeton that included presentations, celebrations, and a $1,000 prize.

2018 VA Governor's School attendees
2018 VA Governor’s School attendees

In addition, the following CHS students are attending the 2018 Summer Virginia Governor’s School for Humanities and Visual & Performing Arts: Rachel E. Beling-Humanities, Talia Marshall-Humanities, Alyce Yang-Humanities, Davida Rimm-Kaufman-Agriculture, Adria Cafferillo-Instrumental Music (Flute), Sahara Clemons-Visual Arts, Sophia Greenhoe-Dance, Linnea Schenck-VA Governor’s Foreign Language Academies (French). Congratulations on earning this distinguished opportunity!

Jack Timmins and Adela Cervantes have been selected to present at the International Space Station Research and Development Conference in San Francisco this summer.
Jack Timmins and Adela Cervantes will present at the 2018 International Space Station Research and Development Conference.

Jack Timmins and Adela Cervantes have been selected to present at the International Space Station Research and Development Conference in San Francisco this summer. Way to go, Jack and Adela!

 

 

Buford engineers presenting work at STEM conference
Buford middle school students presenting at the National Museum of American History

And lastly, a group of Buford Middle School engineering students have been conference-hopping this summer, presenting their work with the Smithsonian Invention Kits at national conventions in Washington, D.C. and Chicago. The students have been sharing their projects, challenging audiences to make speakers out of every day items, and leading workshops to teach the teachers about using the invention kits in their own labs.