Visit Venable: Tours for prospective parents

Ven-Bldg_edVenable will be offering tours to prospective parents on the dates listed below.  All tours take place at 9:15 a.m. and last approximately 45 minutes. We limit the number of participants on each tour to ensure that everyone can hear and ask questions.  Please call Ms. Lawson in the Venable office to register – 434-245-2418.

Upcoming Dates:

  • November 7
  • December 5
  • January 9
  • February 6
  • March 12
  • April 23

Parents should plan to arrive in the front office a few minutes early to sign in and receive visitors’ passes.  Please allot time for parking as there are only a few spots available on site and many of the neighborhood streets do not permit non-resident parking during the day.

Unfortunately, requests for tours at other dates and times cannot be honored due to the disruption to classes.

If you are an out-of-division family who would like to apply for a space at Venable next year, we begin accepting applications in April.  For information about the application process, click here and select the “Non-resident Student” tab. 

Tours for Potential Jackson-Via Students

Front of Jackson-Via Elementary SchoolJackson-Via will be offering tours to parents on the dates listed below.  All tours take place at 9:15 a.m. and last approximately 30-45 minutes. We limit the number of participants on each tour to ensure that everyone can hear and ask questions.  Please call Ms. Harlow in the Jackson-Via office to register – 434-245-2416.

Upcoming Dates:

  • November 18
  • December 2
  • January 13
  • February 10
  • March 10
  • April 14

Parents should plan to arrive in the front office a few minutes early to sign in and receive visitors’ passes.  Please allot time for parking as there are typically few spots available on site and many of the neighborhood streets do not permit non-resident parking during the day.

Unfortunately, requests for tours at other dates and times cannot be honored due to the disruption to classes.

If you are an out-of-division family who would like to apply for a space in Charlottesville City Schools next year, we begin accepting applications in April.  Click here for information about the application process. 

Slides for Community Conversations on Equity February 2020

February 2020
Charlottesville City Schools
Community Conversations on Equity
Content of Slides Available for Google Translate


Welcome & Agenda

  • Greetings
  • Overview of equity goals & work
  • Discussion guidelines
  • Small-group discussion
  • Brief reports/wrap-up

2019-2020
Charlottesville City Schools
Equity Priorities


Process

  • Public/Staff Input
  • Equity Committee
  • Research of Best Practices

Four Key Areas

  1. Supported/Supportive Staff. This includes diversifying our staff and equipping our educators to succeed and help all students succeed.
  2. Diverse, Inclusive, and Rigorous Learning Experiences. Let’s embrace our diversity — in classrooms’ student composition and in richly varied and challenging learning activities.
  3. Growing Relationships/Community. As we help our staff and students feel connected, supported, and safe, we will learn from one other for our mutual gain.
  4. Equity Foundations. We want to be systematic and proactive as we make positive change. Let’s follow — and establish — best practices.

Supportive/Supported Staff
This includes diversifying our staff and equipping our educators to succeed and help all students succeed.

Examples on the hand-out:

  • Strong and diverse hiring class
  • Revised models for mentoring and instructional coaching
  • Professional training in areas such as implicit and institutional bias

Other examples:

  • Professional training in areas such as restorative justice
  • Preschool observations documenting teacher-student interactions

Diverse, Inclusive, and Rigorous Learning Experiences

Let’s embrace our diversity — in classrooms’ student composition and in richly varied and challenging learning activities.

Examples on the hand-out

  • Expanding unleveled (or honors-option) classes at CHS, Buford, Walker
  • Redesign of gifted program
  • Diversifying social sciences

Other examples

  • New curriculum/pathways (math, reading, preschool, CTE)
  • Better alignment of curriculum to standards\Revised GPA calculations

 


Growing Relationships and Community

As we help our staff and students feel connected, supported, and safe, we will learn from one other for our mutual gain.

Hand-out

  • Mental wellness
  • Restorative justice
  • School culture

Other examples

  • Hired second Family Engagement Facilitator
  • Redesigned Attendance Officer positions to be a more supportive and proactive Family
  • Support role
  • Expanding social-emotional learning

Equity Foundations
We want to be systematic and proactive as we make positive change. Let’s follow — and establish — best practices.

On hand-out

  • New policies on equity and anti-racism
  • Division and school-level equity committees
  • Alignment with regional/national equity groups
  • Other examples

Using data better

  • Wi-fi hotspots in library
  • Redesign of middle school and preschool facilities
  • School safety/facilities upgrades

Updates on these Goals
For in-depth and continued updates:
charlottesvilleschools.org/equity

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram at @CvilleSchools (and related accounts)
Request to receive the Superintendent’s Newsletter by calling or emailing vickk1@charlottesvilleschools.org
Attend or watch School Board meetings (first Thursday, 5pm)


We want to hear from you…

  1. What have you seen, heard, or noticed about the schools’ equity work this year?
  2. What’s going well (with the schools’ work on equity)?
  3. What still needs to happen (with the schools’ work on equity)?
  4. What is a sign you could point to in the future that would show that the schools have made progress on equity?

Breakout Sessions


We want to hear from you…

  1. What have you seen, heard, or noticed about the schools’ equity work this year?
  2. What’s going well (with the schools’ work on equity)?
  3. What still needs to happen (with the schools’ work on equity)?
  4. What is a sign you could point to in the future that would show that the schools have made progress on equity?

Group Report Out


Thank you for attending.

Winter Sports Feb 2020 colleage (basketball, wrestling, track). Call 245-2962 with questions.

February 2020 News and Highlights

A Word from Superintendent Dr. Rosa Atkins

Johnson students in superhero gear for kindness weekDear staff, family, and community:

I write this note in the midst of Kindness Week in our schools. For instance, the superheroes at the right wore capes and masks to remind us that we all have the power to be kind. Does it get any cuter?

Love and kindness are key to our schools. Kindness is always available to us, but it is also hard to carry out. Many on our staff were reminded of this truth by Dr. Luvelle Brown, a native son who is now Superintendent in Ithaca Public Schools in New York. He reminded us that we need a culture of love to make our schools better for everyone. This newsletter reflects some of the ways we are taking care of our students, staff, and families. It also reminds us about next week’s Community Conversations on Equity, a chance for us to reflect on our equity work and what has (and hasn’t) gone right.

As we move forward, let’s take a cue from these little ones and lead with kindness. Now where did I put my cape?

Dr. Rosa Atkins

 

Collage of CHS sports (basketball, wrestling, swimming, track) during 2020 postseason.

Go Black Knights! We’re cheering you on in post-season play. Boys’ and girls’ hoops swept the Jeff District championship tourney and start regionals Friday night at home. Coach Mitch Minor has won 400+ career games at CHS. Wrestlers, swimmers, and track/field athletes are heading to states. Find details here. (Photos courtesy Andrew Shurtleff/Daily Progress and Tony D’Alessio.)

SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS: AN UPDATE. 
Dr. Atkins and Board members at February 2020 work session. Courtesy K. Knoot/Daily ProgressAs noted last month, we have been exploring options for how to attract and retain substitute teachers. A few updates: We’ve had some successes recruiting additional subs, we are budgeting to raise subs’ pay next year, and we are implementing better ways to welcome and support subs. In addition, at Walker, Buford, and CHS, we will start compensating teachers who need to cover for peers when no sub is available.  We’re also exploring how to begin a similar system at the elementaries. Read Daily Progress coverage.

EQUITY CONVERSATIONS: HEAR WHAT’S NEW. SHARE YOUR FEEDBACK.
Jackson-Via renovationWe’re hosting four Equity Conversations from 2/24-2/27, a chance for the community to hear what we’ve been working on and to share their perspectives. Dates are 2/24 at 6pm at CHS, 2/25 at 6:30pm at Friendship Ct., 2/26 at 6:30pm at Boys & Girls Club (Cherry Avenue), and 2/27 at 12pm at City of Promise. Spanish translation and childcare are available. For more information, call 245-2962 or see  our web site.

FOR UPDATE TO BURNLEY-MORAN, ARCHITECTS TALK TO EXPERTS — STUDENTS.
Burnley-Moran students vote on chairs for renovated spaces.As the school division and educational architects VMDO plan for an improvement project at Burnley-Moran, we are gathering feedback from stakeholders — including students. Focus groups of fourth-graders moved through stations to test furniture, explore the proposed designs with virtual reality goggles, and give a thumbs up (or down) to possible elements. Burnley-Moran will be the third elementary to receive a $1 million update. In addition, the City is also currently reviewing proposals to plan the redesign of Walker as a city-wide preschool center and Buford as a grade 6-8 middle school. Learn more.

PROJECT RUNWAY: HIGH SCHOOL EDITION
Clothes and shoes at CHS "Swap Shop"A student-run, no-fee clothing exchange at CHS is a fun and important way to meet students’ needs  — and even their wants. Located near the main office, the swap shop’s racks are available to all. Students and staff can grab a new look AND recycle the things they’re no longer wearing. Student leader Elana West-Smith notes, “I’m a thrifter and I also really enjoy the idea of people being able to have the resources they need.”

FROM WALKER PLAYGROUND TO TEACHER LOUNGE, FAMILIES MAKE A DIFFERENCE.
Walker student playing basketball at recess by Billy Jean Louis/Charlottesville TomorrowTwo family-led projects will make a big impact at Walker. First, over the MLK Day weekend, volunteers completed a weekend make-over of the teachers’ lounge. Next, students will receive a long-awaited playground to enhance their recess choices. Together, the joint Buford-Walker United PTO raised (and continue to raise) funds to build a playground, and the School Board approved the project in February. Thanks for making a difference!

SERVICE LEARNING? IT’S ELEMENTARY. AND MIDDLE SCHOOL. AND BEYOND.
Clark student sewing a wildlife rescue pouchReal-world activities and community service are important ways to bring learning to life, and it’s never too early to start, whether it’s K students practicing conservation, fourth-graders sewing cozy pouches to warm up orphaned wildlife at shelters, Buford students raising money for SARA, or CHS English classes using real estate records for “Mapping Cville” to find patterns of housing inequities. Schools benefit from volunteers, too — whether a visit from Miss Virginia, guest readers from the men of Alpha Phi Alpha, or field trips and mentoring from the UVa Medical Center, the School of Medicineor the School of Engineering.

BLACK HISTORY MONTH? LET’S TAKE IT BEYOND FEBRUARY.
Detail of a Johnson teacher's Black History Month door decorationsFrom door-decorating contests to soul feasts to daily fun facts to guest lecturers or lunchtime performances, our schools are celebrating Black History Month. We were especially charmed by Jackson-Via’s art students, who have studied and been inspired by Black artists. Beyond February, however, we are doing ongoing work to “Change the Narrative” and feature more black and other sometimes-silenced voices in our social science and history classes, assigned readings, and media centers. Learn more about BHM celebrations. 

SCHOOL BOARD NOTES
Cville Schools official logoIn recent weeks, the School Board has continued to work on next year’s budget, holding work sessions and community updates (see the calendar of budget events and presentation slides). At their February meeting, Board members heard updates on the MP3 black male mentoring program and our literacy instruction (including the introduction of a new elementary curriculum). The Board also expressed approval and appreciation for the family-led initiative to add playground equipment to Walker. Find more School Board information, including agendas, minutes, and livestream video.

UPCOMING EVENTS AT-A-GLANCE
illustration of calendarOngoing  Preschool applications. Find info online.
2/24-27 Community Conversations on Equity. See details.
2/27 CHS Band Pre-Assessment Concert, 7pm, MLKPAC
2/29 CHS Choir participates in Winter Songs, 7pm, Monticello HS

3/2-3 No School for professional learning/teacher work day
3/4  Special Education Advisory Committee, 5:30pm, Jackson-Via
3/5 School Board Meeting, 5pm, CHS Media Center
3/5 Harvest of the Month Snack Program (thanks, City Schoolyard Garden)
3/9 Gifted Advisory Committee, 7pm, Division Annex
3/10 School Health Advisory Board, 4pm, Division Annex
3/11 Art Connections Evening Hours (with Buford Jazz Band), 4:30-6pm, CHS Small Gym
3/14 Art Connections Saturday Celebration, 10am-2pm, CHS Small Gym. Note: Enjoy Parent University (10:30am-1pm) while you’re there!
3/18 Art Connections Evening Hours (with Walker Jazz Band), 4:30-6pm, CHS Small Gym

More Looks at Cville Schools

Kids making and enjoying smoothies at Greenbrier cooking class

The family engagement team continues its good work with a cooking class at Greenbrier. Follow @EngageFamCCS.

CHS Symphony on stage at Martin Luther King Performing Arts Center.

CHS held its annual celebration of the arts in January, with joint performances by students in band, choir, orchestra, theatre, and visual arts. If you missed it, you can catch the video here..

Venable's crossing guard Ursula Coleman by Daily Progress/Erin Edgerton

Venable crossing guard Ursula Coleman was named 1 of 6 VA Outstanding Crossing Guards!  Ruth Hill of Clark won the same award in 2016. Thanks to all our hard-working guards who keep our walkers safe!

Find more info and events on on our website, social media, or our Google calendars!

Find us on the web at charlottesvilleschools.org

Detail from a Johnson teacher's door saying Black History Month

Black History Month, February 2020

Black History Month is well underway at Charlottesville City Schools, with morning announcements, door decorations, soul feasts, guest presenters, and more.

Here are just a few examples from social media:

Jackson-Via art students studied and took inspiration from the rich history of Black artists and activists:

 

Johnson families enjoy African-American Heritage Night, complete with a Kehinde Wiley-inspired photo booth created by students (back by popular demand!):

CHS has a series of events, including lunchtime learning on Mondays:

 

Thanks to all the teachers, students, families, and community members who have volunteered to make this month meaningful!

While Black History Month is tremendously important, we continue to work to make sure that diverse perspectives are reflected in our curriculum, media centers, and offerings.  For two more examples from social media, see:

Winter Sports Feb 2020 colleage (basketball, wrestling, track). Call 245-2962 with questions.

CHS February 2020 Sports Update

Winter Sports Feb 2020 colleage (basketball, wrestling, track). Call 245-2962 with questions.Congrats to our winter athletes, and good luck in the post-season!
  • Our boys’ and girls’ hoops teams both captured the Jefferson District Tournament Championship! See highlights for boys (winning again with the buzzer-beater) and for girls (winning with a strong showing).
    • The Region 3C Basketball Tournament starts on Friday, February 21. CHS will host a double-header on Friday with the girls tipping off at 6pm and the boys at 7:45pm. Come cheer on the home teams!
    • Men’s basketball coach Mitch Minor recently earned his 400th career game (now 411!) and was featured in the Daily Progress. Congrats, Coach!
  • CHS hosted its first regional indoor track meet in a very long time, and our athletes competed very well. Our women’s 4 X 800 meter relay team and our women’s 4 x 200 meter relay teams captured the win! Take a look at the results to see how well our other athletes fared. Congrats to all!
  • Good luck to wrestlers Pyi Kant and  Aiden Lewandowski  in addition to swimmer William Kennan as they travel this weekend to Salem and Richmond respectively to participate in their state meets!
  • Thanks to our athletic director (Rodney Redd), along with our coaches, trainers, cheerleaders, fans, and families for your continued support! Go Black Knights!
A painted violin by Aaron Eichorst featuring a pair of luna moths on a purple background.

Silent auction for CHSO Painted Violin Project begins February 21

The Charlottesville High School Orchestra (CHSO) has officially launched its 2020 Painted Violin Project, a special fundraising effort to support the CHSO String Ensemble’s performance at the Lisbon International Youth Music Festival this June.

10 painted violins

10 area artists have generously contributed their time and talent to transform real violins into objects of art. These beautiful, witty creations will be auctioned at the CHSO’s exciting online Silent Auction beginning on February 21, 2020. Bidding is open to the general public and anyone interested in bidding can visit the CHSO website chsorchestra.org between Friday, February 21 and Sunday, March 15.

“The idea of artistically transforming violins has been used by orchestras across the country to raise
funds and to celebrate the marriage of art and music,” said CHSO Director Laura Mulligan Thomas. “For
this project, 10 violins were given to area artists, among them Charlottesville Schools Fine Arts
Coordinator Aaron Eichorst and local favorite artist Meg West.”

An Opening Reception will be held at Tavola on Thursday, February 20, from 6-8 p.m., featuring live music performed by members of the CHSO. This event is free and open to the public. Until then, these beautiful violins will be displayed in various storefronts on the Downtown Mall.

Additional 2020 Painted Violin Artists include Sally Bridgeforth, Andy Faith, Eileen French, Heidi Hutson, Sri Kodakalla, Judy McLeod, Jeanne Mulligan, and Christen Borgman Yates. For more information about the CHSO including a link to the silent auction and list of locations where the violins are displayed, please visit chsorchestra.org.

MORE ON LISBON INTERNATIONAL YOUTH MUSIC FESTIVAL, JUNE 2020

The 2020 Lisbon International Youth Music Festival features more than 30 concerts in the best halls and open-air venues in Portugal and celebrates youth orchestras, choirs, symphonic bands and ensembles from all over the world.

At the Lisbon International Youth Music Festival, young musicians will gather to build friendships and share uplifting performances with 15,000+ music lovers. In addition to their time in Lisbon, the CHSO String Ensemble will travel to Spain to experience the art, history and splendor of Madrid culminating with an evening performance in a sacred venue such as the Baroque church of San Millan y San Cayetano or the Basilica de Jesus de Medinaceli. Perhaps most importantly, CHSO musicians will serve as ambassadors — a vital reminder of music’s power to unite and inspire.

The Charlottesville High School Orchestra has traveled to Europe five times, performing in international competitions and festivals including the City of Charlottesville’s Italian and French sister cities and venues such as Chartres Cathedral, the Votivkirche and Santo Stefano al Ponte.

Community Conversations on Equity to be held Feb. 24-27

Join us for another round of community-wide meetings about our shared commitment to serve all of our students well. We want to hear from you! The slides are posted below, along with a form for online feedback (scroll down). Child care and Spanish translation services will be available. Flyer for Community Conversations on Equity. Dates are 2/24 at 6pm at CHS, 2/25 at 6:30pm at Friendship Ct, 2/26 at 6:30pm at Boys & Girls Club/Cherry Avenue, and 2/27 at 12pm at City of Promise. Spanish translation and childcare available. For more information, call 245-2962.

Additional Information/Resources for these Conversations

 

CHS students in Sigma Lab with visiting UVA Link lab mentors.

Sigma and Link Labs partner for UVA-CHS collaboration

The CHS Sigma Lab and the UVA Engineering Link Lab share a commonality–students serving their communities by solving real problems through engineering solutions. UVA Today recently highlighted the unique partnership formed between CHS engineering teacher Dr. Matt Shields and UVA professor Dr. Jonathan Goodall.

Tale of Two Labs: UVA engineers collaborate with Charlottesville High School students

January 28, 2020

By Audra Book

Matthew Shields, left, gives graduate engineering students (from left) Benjamin Bowes, Natalie Lerma, Arash Tavakoli, Ruijie Zhu, Wenqiang Chen, Luis Lopez Ruiz and Sonia Baee a tour of Charlottesville High’s Sigma Lab.Matthew Shields, left, gives graduate engineering students (from left) Benjamin Bowes, Natalie Lerma, Arash Tavakoli, Ruijie Zhu, Wenqiang Chen, Luis Lopez Ruiz and Sonia Baee a tour of Charlottesville High’s Sigma Lab. (Photos by Tom Cogill)

In 2001, Jonathan L. Goodall earned a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from the University of Virginia, graduating with the foundational belief that community collaborations lead to better engineering outcomes. While completing his Ph.D. in civil engineering at the University of Texas at Austin, then working as a professor at Duke University and the University of South Carolina, Goodall’s teaching emphasized the role community service plays in creating the best engineering solutions.

In 2013, Goodall’s career led him back to UVA Engineering, where he is a professor in the Department of Engineering Systems and Environment and associate director of UVA Engineering’s Link Lab for cyber-physical systems, with nearly 40 faculty members and more than 200 graduate students focused on research in the areas of autonomous systems, smart health and smart cities.

Goodall actively leads the Link Lab in smart cities research by being a good community partner. He stresses to his students the importance of working across traditional boundaries to serve society.

“UVA Engineering sees the value of service and views it as critical to education,” he said. “This is the only way to produce well-rounded graduates.”

Matthew Shields also graduated from UVA in 2001 after earning bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mechanical and aerospace engineering, then completing his multi-degree track at UVA with a Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction from UVA’s Curry School of Education (now the Curry School of Education and Human Development) in 2011. Like Goodall, he embarked on a career having been influenced by a university that places tremendous value on service to society.

CHS engineering teacher Matthew Shields and UVA professor Jonathan L. Goodall both graduated from UVA Engineering in 2001. Now they are bringing their students together to demonstrate the power of community in tackling challenging problems.CHS engineering teacher Matthew Shields and UVA professor Jonathan L. Goodall both graduated from UVA Engineering in 2001. Now they are bringing their students together to demonstrate the power of community in tackling challenging problems.

Shields turned his own UVA learning experience into an evolution in local schools. He created and now directs Charlottesville High School’s Sigma Lab and Engineering Program. The multi-year engineering curriculum culminates in a capstone class, where high school seniors create self-directed team projects designed to solve community problems.

“I tell my students that engineering is about making the world a better place,” he said. “I challenge them to think about an audience here or in the broader world, then design and build something that serves these groups.”

Although Goodall and Shields departed UVA on very different trajectories, they are united in a mission to educate future engineering leaders. Recently, they decided to demonstrate the power of community by bringing their high school and UVA students together for a problem-solving partnership.
Goodall suggested that the Link Lab’s graduate students mentor the Charlottesville High School capstone class seniors. Shields thought this was a particularly good idea because many of the students’ projects were cyber-physical systems, and they would need outside expertise to overcome hurdles in design and development.

“One of my main goals for the engineering program is to connect it to the real world. Collaborating with the Link Lab has provided that authenticity. My students see the connection between the work they are doing and research happening at the graduate level.”

– MATT SHIELDS

Goodall proposed the idea to the Link Lab Student Committee on Culture and Livability, a graduate student organization focused on building community through inclusivity. Arash Tavakoli, a second-year Ph.D. student in civil engineering, and Luis Lopez Ruiz, a fifth-year Ph.D. student in electrical engineering, lead the organization.

Both thought mentoring would be right in line with the committee’s goals to create community conversations that lead to better research. They quickly moved to line up interested volunteers.

“Working with groups outside of those you would normally see leads to a fresh perspective, diversity in insights and better outcomes,” Tavakoli said.

Lopez Ruiz agreed. “Opportunities like this allow us to get out and develop friendships and build bridges of communication that lead to better collaborations overall.”

The teams met for the first time at the Sigma Lab in October. Shields stressed that his vision for the mentorship program extended beyond the technical aspects of engineering into learning how to collaborate. “What does it mean to be a real engineer?” he asked. “It means you solve problems and you work as a team.”

Goodall elaborated on the communal perspective. “What you are doing in this capstone class is a good fit for what Link Lab is doing,” he told the high school students. “We are doing cross-cutting research in cyber-physical systems. This is where the cyber and physical worlds come together, and these are the types of problems we are solving.”

The CHS capstone teams shared their projects and expected challenges. Projects were as diverse as a glove-operated drone, a hands-free musical instrument and an Android app that would allow the school’s gardening teacher to remotely water plants.

Link Lab graduate students offered ideas to help the capstone students overcome challenges. They also discussed methods for ongoing, real-time interaction and settled on using Slack, a cloud-based instant messaging system, for immediate communication between the Link Lab and Sigma Lab. Working together to implement the communication solution demonstrated the importance of teamwork in real-world scenarios.

The UVA Engineering Link Lab and Charlottesville High School Sigma Lab capstone class teams engaged in dynamic problem-solving, demonstrating the importance of collaboration in today’s engineering work environments.The UVA Engineering Link Lab and Charlottesville High School Sigma Lab capstone class teams engaged in dynamic problem-solving, demonstrating the importance of collaboration in today’s engineering work environments.

Sanjana Mendu, a second-year master’s student in the Department of Engineering Systems and Environment, pointed out that today’s engineering careers require more than just book smarts.

“Working with other people is the most important skill to have when you enter the real work environment,” she said. “Being a good team player and leadership are characteristics that my adviser values and seeks to instill.”

Tavakoli shared insights with the high school students about the importance of collaborating across traditional boundaries in modern workplaces.

“For the type of cyber-physical systems research we are doing at the Link Lab, we are looking beyond the foundations to social disciplines like psychology,” he said. “We are becoming better engineers by reaching out to find the expertise we need to create solutions that are socially viable. These skills are necessary in the 21st century, so we want to demonstrate and share that process.”

The graduate students spent additional time touring the Sigma Lab and working in dynamic, problem-solving sessions.

The partnership between the Link Lab and the Sigma Lab will continue, including an open invitation for the capstone teams to visit the Link Lab.

“One of my main goals for the engineering program is to connect it to the real world. Collaborating with the Link Lab has provided that authenticity,” Shields said. “My students see the connection between the work they are doing and research happening at the graduate level. The Link Lab also provides a discerning audience as my students conduct research and document their work.”

The value of the mentorship goes both ways, according to the Link Lab graduate students. “The student committee believes it is so important to get out of your own space and interact,” Lopez Ruiz said.

“Working together in the same physical space is paramount to modern-day engineering,” Goodall said. “This partnership allows us to offer the capstone students additional research experiences that will be an important aspect of learning for these future engineers, educators and researchers.”

Buford NJHS presents check to SARA Executive Director.

NJHS donates money to local non-profit

Group photo of NJHS members and executive director of SARA.Buford members of the National Junior Honor Society are living the five tenets of the NJHS: Everyday Scholarship, Service, Leadership, Character, and Citizenship!

Recently, they presented SARA Executive Director Becky Weybright with more than $300 from funds raised in their holiday candygram sale. Weybright says the fund

Buford NJHS presents check to SARA Executive Director.“We want to make sure everything we do contributes to something bigger even if it something small,” said Meredith Hendricks, Buford Middle School NJHS secretary.

Advisor Susan Muse says these community service activities help students understand “the power of one” and the positive impact they can have in our world by doing things to make our community better.

National Junior Honor Society members volunteering at the Toy Lift Cville event.

The group is also raising money for the Ronald McDonald House by collecting soda can pop tabs, among other projects. Earlier this year, they volunteered to help with the Toy Lift Charlottesville, an annual toy drive that collects and distributes thousands of toys for local area children during the holiday season.

The National Junior Honor Society recognizes students for their accomplishments, but challenges them to develop further through active involvement in school activities and community service.

National Honor Society Members sell Candy Cane Grams.

graphic for academic advising season-look ahead

Looking ahead to 2020-21: Walker, Buford and CHS academic counseling begins

graphic for academic advising season-look aheadIt’s already time to think about next year! Whether you are at CHS, Buford, or Walker Upper Elementary, school counselors are beginning to meet with students and families about course offerings for 2020-21.

Want to learn more about options available next school year? Attend any of the following upcoming events to meet administrators, counselors, teachers, and ask questions:

Meanwhile, counselors are checking in with students during the school day. Walker school counselors are visiting all city fourth grade students to introduce themselves and give information about elective options, while Buford counselors are planning to visit Walker sixth graders, and CHS counselors are visiting Buford eighth graders–all to make next year’s transition easier for our students who are changing schools.

Have questions? Ask your teacher, counselor, or principal!