Resources for Parents and Educators Related to Race

These resources were initially compiled in August 2017 following the  white nationalist rallies in Charlottesville. Tragically, these resources remain relevant and timely.

Resources for Parents and Educators

A number of local agencies and national groups have created resources for family discussions centered on race and/or community violence.

The following have been suggested by our school counselors as potential resources for your consideration. We recognize that this list is not complete, and that different families and teachers will find some links more useful than others. NOTE: this list has not been materially updated since August 2017.

All Ages

All Ages:

Helping Children Feel Safe During Uncertain Times: A Caregiver’s Guide (a brief guide prepared by school counselors at Charlottesville City Schools)

How Can Parents Help Their Children (following community violence)? (resources from the National Child Traumatic Stress Network)

How to Talk to Kids about Race and Books that Might Help (published on readbrightly.com)

How to Talk to Your Kids About Charlottesville (Age-appropriate fiction recommendations from the New York Times)

How to Talk to Your Kids about the Violence in Charlottesville (compiled by the L.A. Times)

Post-Charlottesville Resources (from the Virginia Department of Education)

Promoting Compassion and Acceptance in Crisis (tips compiled by the National Association of School Psychologists)

Resources for Talking About Race, Racism, and Racialized Violence with Kids  (compiled by the Center for Racial Justice in Education)

What Charlottesville Means for Our Black Family (essay published on raceconscious.org)

Young Children

Young Children:

After a Crisis, Helping Young Children Heal (tips from the National Child Traumatic Stress Network)

Once I Was Very Scared. (picture book available as a PDF and also available in Arabic, Spanish, and Turkish). Author: Chandra Ghosh Ippen.  Piplo Productions.

A Terrible Thing Happened. (book for ages 4-7) Author: Margaret M. Holmes. Dalmation Press. Franklin, Tennessee.

Teens

Teens:

Youth Resources for the Charlottesville Rally (compiled by the local organization Ready Kids)

For Educators

For Educators:

I’m a Teacher In Charlottesville. This is How I’ll Talk to My Students. (Washington Post)

Promoting Compassion and Acceptance in Crisis (tips compiled by the National Association of School Psychologists)

For curricular resources, educators can check with their principal, coach, and area coordinators.

Counseling Resources

Community Counseling Resources:

  • Need immediate counseling? If this is an emergency, call 911. Otherwise, you can call Region Ten at any time at 434-972-1800 or 1-866-694-1605 for help or more information.
  • Students: school counselors — send them an email to set up a time.
  • Staff: Employee Assistance Program — visit https://uvafeap.com/
  • Resources for Talking with Children about Race (compiled by Charlottesville City Schools Counselors in August 2017)