Resources for Parents and Educators Following Charlottesville Rally on August 12, 2017

translation buttonThe joint superintendents and School Boards of Charlottesville and Albemarle County have created a message for our community: 

Joint Statement

Dear Members of our School Communities:

The events of this weekend were tragic beyond words and as such events always do, they extracted a heavy price.  A wonderful young lady was taken from us.  Two brave and devoted public servants also lost their lives.  Many of our neighbors suffered injuries and trauma and all of us are sharing in the pain.

One national television reporter asked how Charlottesville will now feel to have its name linked in memory to other cities and towns across our country that have suffered from unspeakable crimes against humanity.

How will we feel and what will we do?

The memory of this weekend’s events should survive as a community that responded forcefully in overcoming the darkest impulses of those who traffic in hatred, intolerance and brute force.

The message from Charlottesville to our nation must be stronger than ever before—that we are a community that values the safety of every person, the dignity of every resident, the respect of every background, the equality of every opportunity and the strength of every collaboration that promotes the common good.

As they should be, the values of our communities are found in our public schools.  Our schools, after all, are the source of our greatest dreams and aspirations for our children.  It is where we learn about the power of ideas, the importance of history, the strength of community and the right of every child to reach their highest potential.

Our schools are where we make acquaintance with civic responsibility.  The work we do in our schools must always bring to life our nation’s most sacred promise– “to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity.”

There is no room in this sacred promise for hatred, racism, violence and intolerance.

The answer to the question from the national media about how Charlottesville will be known is that we will be known as the community that rededicated itself to the promise of America and to those ideals that define our nation’s highest calling.

We will be known as a community whose teachers and staff will continue to do what the best educators always have done—stand tall in modeling these American ideals in their work every day.

If you would like resources for discussing this matter with your family, we have compiled a list for your consideration below.

Dr. Rosa Atkins & Mr. Juan Wade
Charlottesville City Schools

Dr. Pam Moran & Ms. Kate Acuff
Albemarle County Public Schools

A Glimpse into How Our Staff is Moving Forward

This week has been hard, but as our teachers and staff have returned to school this week, we have tried to create space for processing. We want to support our teachers so that they can continue their amazing work of supporting our students. To see videos and pictures from our inspirational all-staff convocation, see @CvilleSchools on Facebook and Twitter.

Convocation Collage

Resources for Parents and Educators

A number of local agencies and national groups have created resources for family  discussions centered on race and/or community violence.

The following have been suggested by our school counselors as potential resources for your consideration. We recognize that this list is not complete, and that different families and teachers will find some links more useful than others.

All Ages

All Ages:

How Can Parents Help Their Children (following community violence)? (resources from the National Child Traumatic Stress Network)

How to Talk to Kids about Race and Books that Might Help (published on readbrightly.com)

How to Talk to Your Kids About Charlottesville (Age-appropriate fiction recommendations from the New York Times)

How to Talk to Your Kids about the Violence in Charlottesville (compiled by the L.A. Times)

Post-Charlottesville Resources (from the Virginia Department of Education)

Promoting Compassion and Acceptance in Crisis (tips compiled by the National Association of School Psychologists)

Tragic Events (Resources) (compiled by the Fred Rogers Company)

What Charlottesville Means for Our Black Family (essay published on raceconscious.org)

Young Children

Young Children:

After a Crisis, Helping Young Children Heal (tips from the National Child Traumatic Stress Network)

Once I Was Very Scared. (picture book available as a PDF and also available in Arabic, Spanish, and Turkish). Author: Chandra Ghosh Ippen.  Piplo Productions.

A Terrible Thing Happened. (book for ages 4-7) Author: Margaret M. Holmes. Dalmation Press. Franklin, Tennessee.

Teens

Teens:

Youth Resources for the Charlottesville Rally (compiled by the local organization Ready Kids)

For Educators

For Educators:
A Guide for Educators in a Community’s Most Difficult Moments (compiled by Albemarle County Public Schools)

When School Starts… (teacher resources compiled by The Washington Post)

I’m a Teacher In Charlottesville. This is How I’ll Talk to My Students. (Washington Post)

Promoting Compassion and Acceptance in Crisis (tips compiled by the National Association of School Psychologists)

For curricular resources, educators can check with their principal, coach, and area coordinators.

Counseling Resources

Community Counseling Resources:

  • Child and Family Clinic (up to age 18)
  • Adult Clink (18 and older) 972-1800
  • Walk-in Clinic on Mondays, Tuesdays, Fridays (can call ahead at 972-1800), 9am-noon